Snack Guidelines

One of the chores assigned to the parents is to provide snacks for the school on a rotating schedule, which should work out to once every 6 weeks or so.   It is our sincere hope that this can be a fun way for you and your child to share part of their school day by choosing a favorite, bringing a staple from your home, or baking together.

On your day, you will be asked to provide two different snacks, one for the a.m. and one for p.m. snacks, each for about (winter session) 29 children children and (summer session) 23 children in the morning and afternoon. Snacks can be brought in on the day they are needed, or non-perishable items can be brought in ahead of time, labeled with the child’s name and snack date, and placed in the kitchen. Refrigerator space is available only during school year program, if necessary. You do not need to provide plates, cups or utensils.

Snack Guidelines (ms word):

NO PEANUTS – TREE NUTS - BANANAS

One of the chores assigned to the parents is to provide snacks for the school on a rotating schedule, which should work out to once every 6 weeks or so.   It is our sincere hope that this can be a fun way for you and your child to share part of their school day by choosing a favorite, bringing a staple from your home, or baking together.

On your day, you will be asked to provide two different snacks, one for the a.m. and one for p.m. snacks, each for about 29 children in the morning and 24 in the afternoon. Snacks can be brought in on the day they are needed, or non-perishable items can be brought in ahead of time, labeled with the child’s name and snack date, and placed in the kitchen. Refrigerator space is available, if necessary, only during school year program. You do not need to provide plates, cups or utensils. There is a wipe off board to record the items you brought for the day as well as noting any special instructions, allergy info etc. Also please record your snack on the snack calendar above the sign in sheet.

Some guidelines:

  • WHDCC is a peanut, tree nut and banana-free facility. Sunflower seed butter is an acceptable replacement for peanut butter. Make sure that you check under the ingredients where it talks about the facility where the product is manufactured.
  • Please provide healthful, toddler-friendly snacks that are simple for the teachers to prepare and serve. (Toddlers – cut grapes only, no carrots)
  • Nothing considered junk food or candy should be provided as a snack.  An exception might be cupcakes on a child’s birthday, but please remember homemade treats are usually healthier than store-bought.
  • Some guidelines of things to avoid may be:  artificial flavors and colors along with hydrogenated oils and foods containing high fructose corn syrup.
  • Please avoid serving raisins, as these can be damaging to children’s teeth.
  • Fruits should be delivered thoroughly washed and ready to serve, with the exception of fruits such as apples and pears which will brown if sliced. The teachers can slice these just prior to serving.
  • Foods prepared at home: If you and your child choose to bake or prepare your snack at home, please follow sensible food handling guidelines, such as: hand washing prior to handling foods and after touching the face or using the toilet, adequate cooking times, and proper storage before delivery to the school.  Please be sure to maintain sanitary conditions so that we will not be forced to restrict snacks to only packaged items.
  1. Quantity: A couple of large bags of pretzels or boxes of crackers will more than suffice, or one small apple or half a large apple per child. Please remember to check ingredients on package for nuts and bananas

Examples:                 

  • Wheat crackers with sunflower seed butter or cheese
  • Seedless grapes (washed) (cut for toddlers)
  • Tortilla chips and mild salsa
  • Pretzels (no Snyders brand as are made in factory using nuts) 
  • String cheese or cheese cubes
  • Flavored yogurt, or plain yogurt with fruit
  • Homemade bread or muffins (no nuts or bananas)
  • Mini bagels and cream cheese
  • Cucumber/celery sticks or baby carrots (not carrots for toddlers)
  • Granola bars (look for nuts or packaged in a plant using nuts or nut oil)
  • Applesauce
  • Fresh fruit of any kind (washed)
  • Finger foods with dip such as ranch dressing or hummus

Providing snacks need not be a time-consuming or expensive venture. Remember, you can easily grab a bag of apples or a couple large bags of pretzels during your routine shopping trip if you don’t have time (or desire) to do something fancy. The key is to work with your child so that they take pride in serving “their” snack to their classmates.

Have fun and, as always, thank you for your assistance and cooperation.               

WHDCC Board